Ford F-150 | Signature Detail

Recently, we were approached by a frequent client of ours who purchased a Ford F-150.

Our client bought it with the intention of using it as a workhorse, but even workhorses need a little TLC.

 

After consulting with him, we decided that the best treatment for his F-150 was a Signature Detail; a complete chemical and mechanical decontamination of both the interior and the exterior.

 

With the work approved and the keys left with us, it was time to get to work.

 

We begin our process with a wash. As with every detail we perform, we begin with a wash. We'll keep this coverage brief, but for an in-depth look at our wash process, take a look at our Maintenance Wash Blog

 

Our detail techs, Bryan and Jakob, filled up our three buckets and got to washing. They began, as always, with cleaning the wheels, tires, and fender wells. A mixture of different chemicals were used for each material on each corner of the car, and were then agitated with several specialized brushes for maximum cleaning capability.

Once each corner was cleaned, the guys rinsed down their work.

 

The car was foamed from top to bottom. Jakob went through and agitated the foam in hard to reach areas with a boar's hair brush.

After some time was given for the foam wash to lift any large, harmful debris, careful attention to detail was spent on the badges, grilles and gas door. The first rinse down was performed.

 

Immediately after, Jakob applied another coat of foam to car, this time with the intention of applying wash mitts.

Once the second coat of foam is applied, both Jakob and Bryan got to work washing every square inch of the paint.

 

Using our methodical technique, every fleck of paint is safely wiped down and cleaned, as well as the exterior glass on the car.

After the car was thoroughly washed, the guys finished the process off with a nice rinse.

 

Here's where the Signature Detail picks up where the Maintenance Washes leave off. The next step in this process involves getting into the engine bay and giving it a thorough clean.

During this process, we carefully clean all of the paint and degrease the engine bay in the safest manner possible, ensuring all sensitive engine parts are covered from the water introduced.

 

Instead of drying the truck down, Jakob and Bryan go through and begin a clay bar of the car. We begin this process without drying the car to allow the water still on the car to aid in the lubricity of the paint while applying the clay bar. To ensure maximum lubricity, we also lead our clay bar with a special clay lubricant.

This clay bar technique is used to pick up any sort of contaminant within the paint that is too embedded to be removed by other means. Much of this large debris contributes to the rough feeling paint sometimes has. This step is ideal before applying paint sealant to ensure that dirt and debris is not being sealed within the paint.

 

After a full clay bar of the vehicle, the truck is rinsed back down, washing off any and all clay lubricant and lifted debris. Finally, the car is dried off. Jakob goes through with the Master Blaster while Bryan catches stray beads of water with an ultra-plush microfiber towel.

With the exterior prepped, Bryan is relieved of his duties and Jakob focuses his efforts on the interior of the F-150.

 

Jakob opens up all of the doors and begins to scrub down the interior with Adam's Leather & Interior Cleaner. He first focuses on the dash, steering wheel, and center console. These are gone through with a fine boar's hair brush.

Once every nook and cranny of both the steering wheel, dash and center console are sufficiently cleaned and wiped down, Jakob sets his sights onto the seats.

 

He begins with the driver's seat and rotates counter-clockwise. A healthy application of leather and interior cleaner is laid, and Jakob gets to work with the Adam's Cockpit Brush to maximize efficiency and efficacy on the expansive, flat surfaces.

Jakob works each seat, one at a time, then wiping down to remove the dirt and oils lifted thanks to the cleaner.

 

At long last, Jakob reaches the final step of cleaning the interior: a solid vacuuming. He quickly whips out the vacuum cleaner and gets to work on the carpet.

This particular vehicle was not in need of a carpet extraction. However, if it were, we would utilize our steam extractor to remove as many stains as possible.

 

With the interior buttoned up, Jakob adds the final touches on the exterior. Bryan tags back in for the final stretch. He begins with applying tire dressing to the tires, double checking the cleanliness of the wheels along the way. A deep, matte shine is brought to the sidewall of the tire.

Methodically working his way through each corner, Bryan brings each tire back to life. 

 

The next step is a polish of the exhaust tip, a particularly rewarding step. Metal polish is applied to the exhaust tip with fine steel wool, and buffed with a soft microfiber.

With the gleam brought back to the exhaust, it was time for the final step.

 

A thick layer of Adam's Paint Sealant is applied to the truck. This product is used to bring shine to the paint, as well as give it hydrophobic properties. This makes the vehicle easy to clean in the months to come.

 

Once the entirety of the vehicle has Adam's Paint Sealant applied, Jakob goes back through and buffs the excess off, leaving an invisible coat of sealant behind. 

 

And with that step completed, our Signature Detail on this F-150 is at its end. This car is now fully decontaminated, fully cleaned, and roadworthy.

 

If desired by the client, this vehicle is ready to take steps toward correction with machine polishing, and protection with Modesta coatings or Paint Protection Film.

 

If you are interested in purchasing some of the products utilized in this process, you can find them at the link below!

 

https://www.automotiveaesthetic.com/adam-s-products

 

 

Please reload

  • Facebook - Black Circle
  • Instagram - Black Circle
  • YouTube - Black Circle

Copyright 2017 Automotive Aesthetic, LLC

Website and Design by Sam Stamler

Photography by Sam Stamler and Ryan Jones

Design Intern: Becky Nardacci